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Searsport Launches 2014 Tonka Truck Restoration Project for Fling Into Fall Celebration

As part of Searsport’s annual Fling Into Fall celebration on October 10 and 11, Searsport resident Joe Plummer has scheduled Tonka truck repair workshops with for children who would like to fix up a truck. The restored trucks will be displayed in Mosman Park at Fling Into Fall and trophies and prizes will be awarded by age group for Best Restoration. Tonka truck repair workshops will be held at Searsport Motor Company, 315 E. Main St. in Searsport on Saturday, September 27, 9:00 am to noon, and at Searsport Automotive and Tires, 357 W. Main St. on October 4, 9:00 am to noon. Contact Joe Plummer at 207-548-2834 if you would like to register for the project and receive a truck to repair.

A prize-winning truck from 2013

A prize-winning truck from 2013

“Last year we had forty-five children sign up,” says Joe Plummer. “When the kids come to the workshops, they get to work with professionals and use a sandblaster and paint. It is very exciting for them. We have both boys and girls repairing trucks. We are grateful to Searsport Automotive and Tires and Searsport Motor Company for donating their time and materials to the project.”

The Tonka Truck Restoration Project is part of Searsport’s annual autumn celebration Fling Into Fall, which is on Friday and Saturday, October 10th and 11th. There will be a parade, music, an antique car show, a craft show, delicious food, a scarecrow contest, face painting, pumpkin carving, an art exhibit and more. The parade begins at 11:00 am on Saturday and the Antique Car Show begins at 11:30 am at Mosman Park. The Tonka Trucks will be on display during the car show and judging will be at 2:30 pm.

For more information on the Tonka Truck Restoration Project call Joe Plummer at 207-548-2834.

 

University of Maine Scientist Speaks About Floating Offshore Wind: Becoming a Reality? at Penobscot Marine Museum

Dr. Andrew Goupee, University of Maine

Dr. Andrew Goupee, University of Maine

Can off-shore wind power reduce our dependence on fossil fuels? On Thursday, September 25, at 7:00 pm, Dr. Andrew Goupee of University of Maine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center will talk about the exciting research and the projects at University of Maine which makes Maine one of the leaders in pioneering offshore wind research in the U.S. The scientists at the University of Maine may possibly change our energy future.

Dr. Andrew J. Goupee holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and is the Libra Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maine. Dr. Goupee teaches core mechanical engineering courses in addition to wind energy engineering and has performed research in the areas of solid mechanics, geophysics and marine renewable energy. Currently, Dr. Goupee’s research employs model testing and numerical methods to investigate the dynamic behavior of offshore floating wind turbines.

Floating Offshore Wind: Becoming a Reality? at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Main Street Gallery, 40 East Main Street, Searsport. Tickets are $8 for members and Searsport residents and $10 for non-members.

Penobscot Marine Museum recreates an historic seacoast village on three acres with hands-on activities and demonstrations in ten exhibit buildings on Route One in Searsport, Maine. The museum is open May 24 through October 19, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, Sunday noon to 5:00 pm. Admission is free for Searsport residents and museum members. Admissions, Museum Store and Museum Framer are at 40 East Main Street, Searsport, Maine.

The Photography of Antonia Small at Penobscot Marine Museum

Antonia Small grew up fishing with her uncle on Mobile Bay, so she is happy to now live in Port Clyde, Maine within earshot of the sea and walking distance to a wharf or a beach. She discovered photography as a young adult, then combined her love of both photography and the sea by working with French maritime photographer Philip Plisson. Her photographic work is devoted to the study of relationships between people, place and time, particularly sea-infused places and the people who love those places. Her photographs have been shown in group and solo shows in New England, New York and France. The Photography of Antonia Small opens Tuesday, September 9 at Penobscot Marine Museum, and honors remarkable people in coastal villages doing whatever they can to keep the centuries-old link to fishing and to the sea alive. The exhibit’s opening reception is Saturday, September 13, from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm in PMM’s Main Street gallery, 40 East Main St, Searsport, Maine.

Antonia Small, Fishinghouse detail

Antonia Small, Fishinghouse detail

Penobscot Marine Museum recreates an historic seacoast village on three acres with hands-on activities and demonstrations in ten exhibit buildings on three acres Route One in Searsport, Maine. The museum is open May 24 through October 19, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, Sunday noon to 5:00 pm. Admission is free for Searsport residents and museum members. Admissions, Museum Store and Museum Framer are at 40 East Main Street, Searsport, Maine.

Jason Constantine at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Maine Boatbuilders Forum

Jason Constantine, President of North End Composites and Back Cove Yachts in Rockland, Maine, is the featured boat builder on Penobscot Marine Museum’s Maine Boatbuilder’s Forum, Thursday, September 11, at 7:00 pm. Back Cove Yachts and its sister company of Sabre Yachts together form the largest recreational boatbuilding company in the State of Maine. The Forum topic, Boat Builders of West Penobscot Bay, Stockton to Port Clyde encompasses the homeport of the Maine Windjammer fleet and the lobster and fishing industries, and is as well as the jumping off point for the large islands running down the spine of the Bay. The boatbuilders of the West Bay build and maintain the vessels needed in these industries and recreational pursuits. This program is in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Main Street Gallery, 40 East Main Street, Searsport, Maine. Tickets are $8 for members and $10 for non-members. For more information go click here or call 207-548-2529 or 0334.

 Back Cove Yachts, Rockland, Maine

Back Cove Yachts, Rockland, Maine

Penobscot Marine Museum recreates an historic seacoast village on three acres with hands-on activities and demonstrations in ten exhibit buildings on three acres Route One in Searsport, Maine. The museum is open May 24 through October 19, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, Sunday noon to 5:00 pm. Admission is free for Searsport residents and museum members. Admissions, Museum Store and Museum Framer are at 40 East Main Street, Searsport, Maine.

Benefit in Memory of Mike Stein

In memory of Penobscot Marine Museum’s beloved Board Member Dr. Mike Stein, and to celebrate his love of the water and boating, Jerri Finch has donated her beautiful painting West Fork to raise funds in his memory. The painting is oil on board, 9 1/2″ x 14 1/2″, and has a lovely wooden frame. Purchase your raffle tickets or make a donation in Mike’s memory online here. The drawing will be on December 15th at the museum.

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West Fork by Jerri Finch

Three for the road: Art shows worth abandoning the beach for

Story By Kathleen Pierce in the Bangor Daily News

Blue Fish, 1988, painted wood, 48"x56"x30"

Blue Fish, 1988, painted wood, 48″x56″x30″

Besides the line at Red’s and mounting traffic on Route 1, there is another Maine mainstay in overdrive this summer — art shows. It’s tough to wade through the onslaught of openings between trips to the beach, but here are three shows worth ditching your blanket for on the coast. Rockland artist Eric Hopkins, known for playful paintings of Maine islands, hosts a retrospective at Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport called “Shells, Fish & Shellfish.” The varied solo exhibit, which opens this week, provides a deeper look into the beach detritus that has inspired the North Haven son of a fish monger. Anyone familiar with Hopkin’s abstract island-scapes will enjoy seeing these elegant wood and glass sculptures along with paintings and monotypes that are rarely on view.

Learning to blow glass from rockstar artist Dale Chihuly while a student at RISD, Hopkins jumps from the frame to the pedestal with ease. Like many artists he was informed by the surroundings of his childhood. “The rocks and shells and bones and branches were my play things,” he said in a prepared statement. “I’d see the patterns of clouds repeated on the waves on the water and later in the flesh of the filleted flounder.”

Read the full story in The Bangor Daily News

‘Shells, fish, shellfish’ inspire art Eric Hopkins draws on a life by the water

Story by Carl Little in The Working Waterfront

Broken Shell Form #1, by Eric Hopkins

Broken Shell Form #1, by Eric Hopkins

Let’s get the punning out of the way, pronto: Eric Hopkins is a shellfish artist. To be more precise, he is a renderer, in many mediums, of shells and fish and shellfish, as the title of his show at the Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport, “Eric Hopkins: Shells—Fish—Shellfish,” puts it.

And this fact may well be a revelation to visitors who only know Hopkins by way of his often transcendent aerial views of the Maine archipelago. Indeed, the exhibition makes a powerful case for a body of work deserving of equal attention and acclaim.

The Bangor-born, North Haven-bred artist began exploring shells and fish as a youngster. The earliest piece in the show is a watercolor made in 1955 when Hopkins was four years old. While reflecting a boy’s fascination with fish—he has often told the story of painting directly on a codfish he had caught in order to keep its colors from fading, only to have his “artwork” disposed of by his mother when it began to stink—this piece of juvenilia already displays the energy of his later work, in particular, the darting fish with its craggy fin.

Read the full story

An African-American Settlement in Troy Maine with Chris Marshall

Chris Marshall presents his research on a African-American settlement in Troy,Maine. He researches the ecology and historical archaeology of early Euro-and Afro-American settlers in Central Maine back-country, with emphasis on land-human interaction and landscape archaeology.

Video by George Kerper

About Ship Modeling with Nic Damuck

Everything you ever wanted to know about ship models and more! Bluejacket Ship Crafters owner Nic Damuck has been making models for over thirty years. Hear about the fascinating world of exquisite wooden ship models which has devotees around the globe.

Video by George Kerper

art current: Gee’s Bend Quilts at the Penobscot Marine Museum

Story by Britta Konau in The Free Press

Crazy Quilt by Lucy Mongo

Crazy Quilt by Lucy Mongo

The story of Gee’s Bend quilts is a complicated, sad and happy one. Gee’s Bend, a remote, historically African-American village on a peninsula formed by the Alabama River, originated in the early 1800s from slave cabins of Joseph Gee’s cotton plantations. Women slaves and their emancipated descendants made quilts from worn-out clothes, feed sacks, and whatever scraps might be usable to provide warmth in unheated housing. Poverty was rampant and interaction with neighboring towns limited (ferry service was suspended by the cross-river town in response to Benders’ civil rights protests). How the rest of the world found out about those quilts has been recounted many times. In 1997, William Arnett, an art collector and scholar, tracked down the women after having seen photographs of some of their quilts. He bought nearly 700 old quilts and contracted for intellectual property rights to all quilts made before 1984, which he transferred to his non-profit promoting vernacular art, Tinwood Alliance. In 2002, the nationally touring exhibition of 70 quilts from that collection, “The Quilts of Gee’s Bend,” took the art world by surprise and was followed by commodification of the quilts’ designs into home products (postal stamps, too, were issued).

Read the full story in The Free Press