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Free Admission to Penobscot Marine Museum During Searsport’s Fall Festival

fling-into-fall-poster-1-620-paint-1

Admission will be free at Penobscot Marine Museum for all visitors during Searsport’s annual Fling Into Fall celebration on Friday, October 2nd and Saturday, October 3rd. In addition, the Museum Store will offer 20% off all purchases on Saturday, October 3rd. Many Searsport businesses are offering sales for the festival weekend. Grasshopper Shop is having a 20% storewide sale on Friday and Saturday, WORKS is having a storewide sale on books, and Searsport Shores Campground is offering free camping to Searsport residents. For more information on call Kathy at 207-548-2529 ext. 216.

Antique Auto, Fling Into Fall 2014 First Place Jack O’ Lantern, Fling Into Fall 2014 Restored Tonka Truck, Fling Into Fall 2014

Antique Auto, Fling Into Fall 2014
First Place Jack O’ Lantern, Fling Into Fall 2014
Restored Tonka Truck, Fling Into Fall 2014

Touch-A-Truck and chain-saw sculpting are two of the new activities at Searsport’s annual Fling Into Fall festival. Rockin Ron and the New Society Band will be playing rock and doo-wop in the evening. Fling Into Fall begins at noon on Friday, October 2nd with Jack O’ Lantern and Scarecrow set-up on the Crescent, and ends at 6:00 pm on Saturday, October 3rd with a Public Italian Supper at the Congregational Church. For a full schedule or more information check the Fling Into Fall Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/flingintofall?fref=ts or call Kari at Searsport Rec. Dept. 207-548-2769.

Touch-A-Truck New to Searsport’s Fall Festival

First Place Jack O’ Lantern, Fling Into Fall 2014

First Place Jack O’ Lantern, Fling Into Fall 2014

Firetrucks, a marine patrol boat, race car, Central Maine Power truck and more will all be available for kids and adults to touch and climb into at Searsport’s annual Fling Into Fall celebration on Friday, October 2nd and Saturday, October 3rd. Also new to the festival is Pasco Grove, who will be making chain-saw sculpture, and a cash prize award for the best float in the Fling Into Fall Parade.

Restored Tonka Truck, Fling Into Fall 2014

Restored Tonka Truck, Fling Into Fall 2014

Children who renovate Tonka trucks will be competing again this year in the very popular Tonka Truck Restoration Challenge. Jack O’ Lanterns and Scarecrows will be displayed on the Crescent, Searsport Public Safety professionals again challenge Stockton Springs, Prospect and Frankfort to a Chili Cook-Off. There will be a Big Parade, Craft Show, Antique Car Show, Apple Pie Baking Contest, and Rockin Robin and the New Society band will be playing doo-wop and rock.

Antique Auto, Fling Into Fall 2014

Antique Auto, Fling Into Fall 2014

Grasshopper Shop, WORKS, Searsport Shores Campground and Penobscot Marine Museum Store will be offering discounts to all customers on Friday, October 2nd and Saturday, October 3rd. Penobscot Marine Museum admission will be free for everyone on Friday, October 2nd and Saturday, October 3rd.

Fling Into Fall begins at noon on Friday, October 2nd with Jack O’ Lantern and Scarecrow set-up on the Crescent, and ends at 6:00 pm on Saturday, October 3rd with a Public Italian Supper at the Congregational Church. For a full schedule or more information check the Fling Into Fall Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/flingintofall?fref=ts or call Kari at Searsport Rec. Dept. 207-548-2769.

The Life of LIFE Photographer Kosti Ruohomaa

Twenty-Best-Poster-Link

Photo by Kosti Ruohomaa in the Penobscot Marine Museum collection

Many legends surround the Finish-American photographer Kosti Ruohomaa, and it is said his life was “haunted”.  Ruohomaa was an award-winning photo journalist who shot iconic portraits of working Americans which appeared in LIFE, National Geographic, and other publications from 1940 to 1960, but Maine was always his favorite subject.  Deanna S. Bonner-Ganter, Curator of Photography at the Maine State Museum, has studied Kosti Ruohomaa for twenty years and her biography of Ruohomaa will soon be published by Down East Books.  On Thursday, September 24 at 7:00 pm she will give an illustrated talk Close to the Land & Close to the Sea: The Photography of Kosti Ruohomaa at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8, or  $5 for Museum members and Searsport residents.

Close to the Land & Close to the Sea: The Photography of Kosti Ruohomaa is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, and an historic darkroom.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Meet the Fishermen from Port Clyde Fresh Catch

Fresh shrimp at Port Clyde Fresh Catch

Fresh shrimp at Port Clyde Fresh Catch

Building boats and fishing occupied every coastal town in Maine during the 1800’s. By 1855 Maine was building 35% of all of America’s ships, and its fisheries fed much of the country. Today Maine has only 20 miles of working waterfront left, and 80% of the seafood eaten in America is imported. In 2007 Port Clyde was the last surviving ground-fishing fleet between Portland and Canada. To save their livelihood a group of Port Clyde fishermen got together to found Port Clyde Fresh Catch and became the first community-supported fishery in the United States. The idea came from community-supported agriculture, a model used by farmers in which consumers pay a membership fee for weekly shares of food. These fishermen have preserved their fishing community, their maritime heritage, and by using environmentally sustainable fishing methods they are helping to preserve the fisheries. There are now dozens of community-supported fisheries in the USA and Europe.

Fresh fish at Port Clyde Fresh Catch

Fresh fish at Port Clyde Fresh Catch

On Thursday, September 10, at 7:00 pm the fishermen of Port Clyde Fresh Catch will be at Penobscot Marine Museum for an illustrated panel discussion about fishing in Maine, their pioneering community-supported fishery, how they started it, and Port Clyde Fresh Catch today. This community forum will be held in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine. Tickets are $8 or $5 for Penobscot Marine Museum Members. for more information, or to purchase tickets online, click here.

Have Your Tintype Taken Again!

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

The tintype photography booth at Penobscot Marine Museum was so popular in July that the museum has arranged for the booth to return, giving everyone another opportunity to have their tintype taken. The tintype booth is run by the AgNO3 Lab, which specializes in formal tintype portraits. The tintype process will be demonstrated to visitors during the day as the portraits are made.  The tintype booth will return to Penobscot Marine Museum, Searsport, on Tuesday, August 18, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.  Portraits will be made on a first come first served basis but reservations are recommended.  Portraits are $40 per tintype, which includes a 2 for 1 museum admission.  To make a reservation for a portrait call the museum at 207-548-0334.

“We are pleased to have the tintype booth back at Penobscot Marine Museum,” says Kevin Johnson, the Museum’s Photo Archivist.  “The booth was booked solid and we had to turn people away.  We had a crowd of visitors happily watching the tintypes being made.  It was fascinating.”  Tintypes were popular in the 1860’s and 1870’s, and many of the photographs taken during the Civil War were tintypes.  They are not made on tin, but are a type of photograph made on a sheet of blackened iron.

Making a Tintype Portrait is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Northern Maine 100 Years Ago in Film at Penobscot Marine Museum

Snowshoes, photograph by Isaac Walton Simpson

Snowshoes, photograph by Isaac Walton Simpson

Isaac Walton Simpson was born in 1874 in Amity, Maine near the Canadian border.  To support his family of thirteen children he worked as a blacksmith, barber, musician, woodsman, mechanic, and photographer.  Over his lifetime Simpson took thousands of photographs.  The photographs, mostly glass negatives, were stored in the attic of the family home until one of Simpson’s grandchildren told filmmaker Sumner McKane about them.  Simpson’s photographs provide a moving and rarely-seen portrait of life in northern Maine at the turn of the century.  McKane interviewed Simpson’s family, found archival film, and used Simpson’s photographs to create The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson, an eye-opening documentary about the men, women and children who carved out a life a hundred years ago in the isolation of northern Maine.

Penobscot Marine Museum presents The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson, Thursday, August 13, at 7:00 pm in the First Congregational Church Vestry, 8 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Live music composed by Sumner McKane accompanies the film.  This event is made possible by a grant from the Maine Humanities Council and the Maine Arts Commission.  Tickets are $10; $7 for Searsport residents and Penobscot Marine Museum Members.  For more information or to purchase tickets go to the event page or call 207-548-0334.

Sumner McKane grew up in Damariscotta, where his father is an electrician.   He is an award-winning filmmaker and musician.  His previous film In the Blood depicts the life, skills, and character of the turn-of-the-century Maine lumbermen & river drivers. He is currently working on a third film entitled Running Rum, an historical documentary that tells the story of rum-runners and bootleggers in the Northeast between the years of 1851-1933. He lives in Wiscasset, Maine with his wife and two children.

The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Make Art with Historic Photographs at Penobscot Marine Museum

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J. Bronstein

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J. Bronstein

Draw, color, and paint on photographs from the Penobscot Marine Museum collection to create your own work of art in the workshop Photoplay with M.J. Bronsteinon Wednesday, Aug 19th.   Artist and photographer M.J. Bronstein pioneered the idea of using photographs as prompts for creativity in her popular PhotoPlay books.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to truly bring history to life, and to share our historic images with the community,” says Kevin Johnson, photo archivist at Penobscot Marine Museum.  “And Marcie Bronstein is the perfect teacher, she inspires creativity.  We are thrilled to have her lead this workshop.”  Bronstein created art programs for Center for Maine Contemporary Art, is the author of many books including PhotoPlay, (published by Chronicle Books, March 2014), and is an onboard artist/instructor for Celebrity Cruises.

Photoplay with M.J. Bronstein is a drop-in workshop offered at Penobscot Marine Museum on Wednesday, Aug 19th between 10:00 am and noon.  Supplies are provided.  Tickets are $5 and free for members and Searsport residents.  The workshop is for all ages, but children must be accompanied by an adult.

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J.

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J.

Photoplay with M.J. Bronstein is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs Workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Create an extraordinary work of art by transforming a  black and white photograph using the historic technique of hand-painting in the Hand-painting Black & White Photographsworkshop at Penobscot Marine Museum.  This intensive workshop, led by fine-art photographer Liv Kristin Robinson, explores traditional methods for applying pigments to black & white images.  Suitable photos will be provided by the museum or bring your own black & white, matte surfaced, images. Painting materials will be provided.  There are two opportunities to take the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop: Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 to 3:00 pm and Wednesday, August 12, 1:00 to 3:00 pm.  The workshop fee is $10, $7 for Museum members and Searsport residents.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Liv Kristin Robinson, a Belfast area fine-art photographer who is well known for her hand-painted images, has shown widely.  Robinson trained as an artist and art historian in New York City, and her originals are to be found in several private and public collections including The New York Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Colby College and the Farnsworth Museum of Art.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Have Your Tintype Taken at Penobscot Marine Museum

Tintypes were popular in the 1860’s and 1870’s and many of the photographs taken during the Civil War were tintypes.  They are not made on tin, but are a type of photograph made on a sheet of blackened iron.  A mobile tintype photography booth will be set up at the Penobscot Marine Museum on Wednesday, July 29 and visitors may have their tintype portrait taken or can watch a tintype demonstration.  The tintype booth is run by the AgNO3 Lab, which specializes in formal tintype portraits. Portraits are $40 per tintype, which includes a 2 for 1 museum admission.  The tintype booth will be set up between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm.  The tintype demonstration begins at 2:00 pm.  Portraits will be made on a first come first served basis or reservations for a portrait may be made by calling the museum at 207-548-0334.

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Making a Tintype Portrait is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs Workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Create an extraordinary work of art by transforming a  black and white photograph using the historic technique of hand-painting in the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum.  This intensive workshop, led by fine-art photographer Liv Kristin Robinson, explores traditional methods for applying pigments to black & white images.  Suitable photos will be provided by the museum or bring your own black & white, matte surfaced, images. Painting materials will be provided.

Liv Kristin Robinson, a Belfast area fine-art photographer who is well known for her hand-painted images, has shown widely.  Robinson trained as an artist and art historian in New York City, and her originals are to be found in several private and public collections including The New York Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Colby College and the Farnsworth Museum of Art.

There are two opportunities to take the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer: Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 to 3:00 pm andWednesday, August 12, 1:00 to 3:00 pm.  The workshop fee is $10, $7 for Museum members and Searsport residents.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography. It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras. The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.