Author Archives: althewebmaster

Historic Coastal Way of Life Documented in Photography Exhibit at Penobscot Marine Museum

Lisa Tyson Ennis takes photographs the slow, old-fashioned way with medium and large format cameras, black and white film, and long exposures. She hand-prints her images one by one in a traditional wet dark room. The subjects that intrigue her are also old-fashioned and disappearing. Her exhibit at Penobscot Marine Museum, What Once Was – Our Changing Fisheries, documents, in her haunting and unusual style, a pre-industrial way of making a living from the sea which is nearly extinct. The opening reception for Ennis’s exhibit is Saturday, June 28, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm in PMM’s Main Street Gallery, 40 East Main St, Searsport, Maine. The exhibit will be at PMM through Tuesday, July 29.

Fishing Weir Study IX Campobello by Lisa Tyson Ennis

Fishing Weir Study IX Campobello by Lisa Tyson Ennis

Lisa Tyson Ennis lives in Lubec, Maine and is fascinated by weir fishing, a sustainable way of herring fishing which used to be practiced in Maine and is now only found in the Maritimes. She travels the coast and photographs weirs when she finds them, hoping to make a final record of these historic weirs before they disappear entirely. She also visits and photographs remote fishing communities in Newfoundland which can only be reached by boat. Many of these remote communities are abandoned, having been “re-settled” by the government when cod fishing declined.

Lisa Tyson Ennis’s photographs are in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Tides Institute in Eastport, the Delaware Art Museum, and the Portland Museum of Art. What Once Was – Our Changing Fisheries is at Penobscot Marine Museum Saturday, June 28 through Tuesday, July 29. Penobscot Marine Museum, on Route One in Searsport, has seven new exhibits and over fifty programs and events during the 2014 season. It is open Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm, and Sunday noon to 5:00 pm through Sunday, October 19.

Build a Row Boat with Cardboard at Penobscot Marine Museum

If you have ever wanted to build your own row boat you will want to come to the Cardboard Boat Workshop on Saturday and Sunday, June 21 and 22, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Hamilton Learning Center, 89 East Main St (Route One) in Searsport. Admission is free.

The Belfast Harbor Fest Cardboard Boat Challenge

The Belfast Harbor Fest Cardboard Boat Challenge

You will learn how to build a cardboard boat which you can enter in the Cardboard Boat Challenge of the Rotary Club of Belfast Harbor Fest in August. On Saturday, June 21 you will learn how to design and assemble your boat, and on Sunday, Jun 22 you will seal and paint your boat. The workshop is taught by Penobscot Marine Museum’s seasoned cardboard boat builder Lin Calista, and by Belfast Rotarians. Some supplies will be available, but please bring your own cardboard, yard stick, paint brush, box cutter, and an idea for your boat design! This workshop is open to all ages, children should be accompanied by an adult.

The Belfast Harbor Fest Cardboard Boat Challenge is on Sunday, August 17 at Steamboat Park in Belfast. Awards will be given in the usual categories and some unusual categories including a “Spirit Award” for the most spirited and best organized team (the looks of the boat don’t count), an “Almost Made It Award “ and a “Submarine Award” for the most spectacular sinking.

For more information on the Belfast Harbor Fest Cardboard Boat Challenge go to www.belfastharborfest.com. Check our events listing for more information on Penobscot Marine Museum’s Cardboard Boat Workshop go or call Lin Calista at 207-548-0334.

Penobscot Marine Museum on Route One in Searsport has seven new exhibits and over fifty programs and events during the 2014 season. It is open Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm, and Sunday noon to 5:00 pm through Sunday, October 19.

Maine Lobster Boat Builders Discuss Their Boats At Penobscot Marine Museum Boat Builders’ Forum

In preparation for the Maine lobster boat racing season the Maine Boatbuilding Forum will host boat builders Travis and Keith Otis, Glenn Holland, Stewart Workman and Calvin Beal, who will debate the qualities that make the very best and fastest lobster boats.  This month’s forum is at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Main Street Gallery on Thursday, June 12, at 7:00 pm.

Lobster Boat Races, Friendship, Maine, courtesy Jon Johansen

Lobster Boat Races, Friendship, Maine, courtesy Jon Johansen

Keith Otis grew up in Maine, joined the Air Force Strategic Air Command then later re-enlisted in the Army’s 1st Calvary Division (Airmobile) where he worked on fire control systems for attack helicopters in Vietnam.   He started Otis Enterprises Marine in Searsport in 1979.  Keith’s son Travis grew up with sandpaper in his hand, helping his dad.  Otis Enterprises Marine has produced over ninety boats, ranging from modest lobster boats to top of the line luxury sportfish boats.  Travis Otis is Vice President of the Maine Lobsterboat Racing Association.

Glenn Holland, of Holland’s Boat Shop in Belfast, started building boats in 1972 with an unfinished Repco hull which he finished in a temporary building on his parent’s front lawn.  Glenn eventually partnered with Royal Lowell and together they designed the Holland 32 which went into production in 1978.   Holland’s Boat Shop is home of the racing lobsterboat “Red Baron”, which won the title “World’s Fastest Lobster Boat” in 2000, and has won over 100 trophies.

Stewart Workman’s father was a lobster boat owner, and Stewart ran his own boat and pulled lobsters out of the water starting in junior high school.  He was in the Coast Guard in Alaska but returned to Maine to focus on schooner and passenger boat restorations, a deep- sea fishing business, and being a yacht captain.  SW Boatworks was founded by Capt. Stewart Workman in 2000.

Calvin Beal started working in and around boat shops as a young boy, helping the old time boat builders of Beals build their boats.  In 1969 Calvin built his own wooden, 22′ lobster boat, then he built a 35′ wooden boat named the Octavia A for his father-in-law.  Calvin worked on wooden boats and plugs until he built his own molds for fiberglass boats in the late ’90s.  After building one hundred and twenty-five boats, Calvin sold the molds to SW Boatworks in Lamoine.

The Maine Lobster Boat Races start on June 14th in Boothbay Harbor.  For a schedule of the races, go to “Fans of Maine Lobster Boat Racing” Facebook page.

The Maine Boatbuilding Forum is moderated by Jon Johansen of Maine Coastal News, and is held at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Main Street Gallery, Route One, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8 members and $10 non-members.  For more information go to www.penobscotmarinemuseum.org or call 207-548-2529 or 0334.

To view calendar listing, click here.

Maine Sail Freight Project Planning Dinner at Tranquility Grange

Last October, the Vermont Sail Freight Project delivered $50,000 of regionally produced foods to customers waiting at the docks along a 300 mile route from Ferrisburgh, Vermont to Brooklyn, New York.  On Sunday, June 22, at 5:00 pm Penobscot Marine Museum, Greenhorns, MOFGA and Maine Farmland Trust are hosting a potluck dinner at Tranquility Grange Hall in Lincolnville to explore the possibilities for a Sail Freight Project along the coast of Maine.  Maine, with its rich maritime history, strong boat building industry, conservation movement, and explosion of local, organic food production is a perfect place for the next sail freight project.  Email Kathy Goldner at the museum kgoldner@pmm-maine.org, or call 207-548-2529 ext.216 to reserve your seat.  Bring a pot luck dish to share.

In October, New Dawn Traders Alex and Lucy set sail on a 7-month voyage around the Atlantic with the cargo vessel TRES HOMBRES and her crew. The  TRES HOMBRES is pioneering a renaissance in shipping cargo by sailboat. This 32 meter, engine-less brigantine has been successfully trading between Europe and islands in the Atlantic and Caribbean since 2009.

In October, New Dawn Traders Alex and Lucy set sail on a 7-month voyage around the Atlantic with the cargo vessel TRES HOMBRES and her crew. The TRES HOMBRES is pioneering a renaissance in shipping cargo by sailboat. This 32 meter, engine-less brigantine has been successfully trading between Europe and islands in the Atlantic and Caribbean since 2009.

The event will begin with a panel presentation by Cate Cronin former Captain of the Hudson River Sloop, Cipperly Good curator at Penobscot Marine Museum, Lu Yodder boat builder and sailor for Mast Brothers Chocolate Sail Project, Patrick Kiley and Severine Fleming of Greenhorns and the Vermont Sail Project, Elisha Kaufman of Mystic Sheaf Traders, and Lance Lee of The Apprenticeshop in Rockport.  The panel presentation will be followed by the pot luck dinner and a community conversation about ideas, proposals, vessel suggestions, and routes for a Maine Sail Freight Project.

The revival of interest in the working sail worldwide is a natural outgrowth of the movement to reduce pollution and dependence on fossil fuels, and to eat locally grown food and support local farmers.  The New Dawn Traders are sailing freight around the world on the TRES HOMBRES out of the Netherlands, Sailing Ship KWAI provides shipping options for the islands in the South Pacific, the Vermont Sail Project is gearing up to make another voyage to from Vermont to New York, and Salish Sea Trading Cooperative is working on delivering freight by sail in Puget Sound.

Our thanks to sponsor Marshall Wharf Brewery in Belfast.  For more information or to volunteer contact hannah@thegreenhorns.net.

Searsport High School Student Boat Launch

Two Shellback dinghies, built by eight students of the Searsport High School in the new Hamilton Learning Center at the Penobscot Marine Museum, were launched on May 28, 2014 at the Hamilton Town Warf. The eight students began building the boats on January 28th, working with master boat builder Greg Rossel and a crew of volunteers from the community. Wayne Hamilton, owner of Hamilton Marine, gave the students their last class on navigation, and now they are ready to launch the boats they had been building for the past four months.

Video by George Kerper

Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Founder and Editor to be Honored at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Gala & Auction

On July 19, Penobscot Marine Museum’s biennial Gala & Auction fundraiser will honor John K. Hanson, Jr. founder and publisher of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors magazine, and Polly Saltonstall, editor in chief of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Polly and John are also both longtime friends and supporters of the museum. The Gala & Auction will be held at Point Lookout Resort in Northport at 5:30 pm.

“We are thrilled to have the opportunity this year to celebrate and honor John and Polly. They have both passionately promote and have made enormous contributions to Maine’s rich maritime culture,” said the museum’s Executive Director Liz Lodge.

artwork in PMM’s Gala & Auction

Artwork in PMM’s Gala & Auction

Penobscot Marine Museum’s biennial Gala & Auction fundraiser provides support for a diverse array of exhibitions, programs and educational initiatives, all celebrating the maritime heritage of the Penobscot Bay region and beyond. This season alone the museum hosts seven new exhibits and over fifty events.

The Gala & Auction begins at 5:30 p.m. with cocktails and a silent auction in Point Lookout’s open-air pavilion, and progresses to Erikson Hall at 7:00 p.m. for dinner, a live auction, and dancing with live music from the band Interplay. Items in the auction include small water craft, hotel overnights, paintings, a mink coat, and theater tickets.

Sponsorships and tickets to the auction are available, and the museum is accepting auction donations. For more information go online www.penobscotmarinemuseum.org or call 207-548-2529.

Purchase tickets online or BID ONLINE NOW!

Penobscot Marine Museum, 40 East Main Street, Searsport, is open for the 2014 season from Saturday, May 24 through Sunday, October 19, Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm, and Sunday noon to 5:00 pm.

Jewelry in PMM’s Gala & Auction

Jewelry in PMM’s Gala & Auction

Author Kate Webber Discusses Life on Swans Island

Penobscot Marine Museum will host author Kate Webber discussing her new book Swans Island Chronicles: Borrowed, Exaggerated and Half-Forgotten Tales of Island Life on Saturday, June 7, at 2:00 pm. Books will be available for signing, and the event will take place in the Penobscot Marine Museum Store, 40 East Main Street, Searsport. Admission is free.

Kate Webber worked through the Island Institute for the Swan’s Island Historical Society for two years and experienced the delights of living on a small isolated Maine island first hand. She tells her stories about the people and island culture with humor and affection. Local legends and spooky tales are included for the reader’s delight. Ms. Webber is now with the Maine Humanities Council.

Left: Swans Island Chronicles: Borrowed, Exaggerated and Half-Forgotten Tales of Island Life by Kate Webber. Right: Author Kate Webber

Left: Swans Island Chronicles: Borrowed, Exaggerated and Half-Forgotten Tales of Island Life by Kate Webber. Right: Author Kate Webber

For more information go online www.penobscotmarinemuseum.org or call 207-548-2529. Penobscot Marine Museum is hosting seven exhibits and over fifty events this season.

Penobscot Marine Museum, 40 East Main Street, Searsport, is open for the 2014 season from Saturday, May 24 through Sunday, October 19, Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm, and Sunday noon to 5:00 pm.

Searsport High School Boatbuilding Class Launch!

Two Shellback dinghies built by Searsport High School students in the new Hamilton Learning Center at Penobscot Marine Museum will be launched on Wednesday, May 28, at noon at the Searsport Town Dock. The eight students began building the boats on January 28, working with master boat builder Greg Rossel and a crew of volunteers from the community. Wayne Hamilton, owner of Hamilton Marine, gave the students their last class on navigation, and now they are ready to launch the boats they have been building for the past four months.

Searsport District High School student learning boatbuilding at Hamilton Learning Center at Penobscot Marine Museum

Searsport District High School student learning boatbuilding at Hamilton Learning Center at Penobscot Marine Museum

This boatbuilding class would not have been possible without the devoted help of community volunteers, who either brought their expertise to the classroom to help the students or donated materials, or both. The Penobscot Marine Museum gratefully thanks Jerry Marancik, Dave Lawrence, Bruce Brown, Rob Griffin, Rich Fitzsimmons, Fred Kircheis, Fred Schmidt, Mary Ann McCrea, Pam Steele, Grant Gambell sailmaker, and Wayne and Loraine Hamilton who generously donated the Hamilton Learning Center to Penobscot Marine Museum.

In building this particular boat, which was deigned by E.B. White’s son Joel, the students learn traditional woodworking skills but also work with modern composites, learning plywood lamination methods. The eight high school students use mathematical equations to make stability tests, ratios for proper mixing of epoxy, applied statistics in making patterns for planks, physics and geometry in their navigation training. They study chemical reactions, galvanic action, exothermic reaction, and air foils when they make the sails. The students also learn the importance of team work and deadlines. Their teacher, master boatbuilder Greg Rossel, is an author and has been teaching boat building at WoodenBoat School for over twenty years.

Penobscot Marine Museum’s Forum “Boat Builders of Mount Desert Island”

Penobscot Marine Museum’s Boat Building Forums “Boat Builders of Mount Desert Island” with Richard Helmke, Richard Stanley, and Ralph Stanley. Mount Desert Island is home to high-end yacht builders, lobster boat builders, and traditional sloop builders. Join us for a discussion of how a 108 mile square island’s boat designers can cater to the summer residents, the lobstermen and commercial fisherman still plying the waters just offshore, and everyone in between.

Video by George Kerper

Merchant Marine Oral History Interview Day to be Held at Penobscot Marine Museum

usmerchant-marine-sealThe Penobscot Marine Museum is partnering with the Seamen’s Church Institute (SCI) to host a day of oral history interviews with merchant mariners on June 24, 2014, from 10-4. During this event, mariners will be invited to come to the museum to record their stories with SCI researchers and volunteers as part of the American Merchant Marine Veterans Oral History Project. Photo archivists at the museum will also be gathering feedback from mariners on their photo collections. The Penobscot Marine Museum will be offering reduced admission for mariners on the day of the interviews ($6). The interviews will be archived and made available as a robust online repository of stories of the sea.

Merchant mariners have contributed significantly to the security and prosperity of the nation–the online archive created by this project brings the compelling stories of local seafarers to light. Johnathan Thayer, SCI Archivist and leader of the project, has interviewed veteran mariners in the Port of New York and New Jersey. “Their remarkable tales represent largely overlooked perspectives within American history,” he says. Johnathan recounts the story of John Ludwick, also known as “Kansas,” who, although he survived the crossing of dangerous WWII North Atlantic waters in a convoy that lost 17 of 33 ships, found himself mistakenly imprisoned in a camp at Leningrad. He tells the story of his escape, stealing a Russian snowmobile and riding it hundreds of miles through arctic tundra back to his ship.

Toiling on board ships often months at a time, merchant mariners work out of the public eye, but SCI—since its very beginnings—has endeavored to bring their labors to light. Through its American Merchant Marine Veterans Oral History Project, SCI helps mariners gain recognition and dignity in the historic record through their own words and Mariners interested in participating should RSVP to Maine-based SCI researcher Michele Christle at michele.christle@gmail.com or at 603-781-9848 to schedule a time for an interview. If transportation or health is an issue, mariners are encouraged to contact Michele Christle for alternative participation methods.

For more information about this event, please contact: Michele Christle, 603-781-9848 michele.christle@gmail.com

us-merchant-marines-going-back-to-sea