News at the Museum

To receive press releases or for more information, contact Kathy Goldner, External Relations Director, kgoldner@pmm-maine.org or 207-548-2529 ext. 216.

Have Your Tintype Taken at Penobscot Marine Museum

Tintypes were popular in the 1860’s and 1870’s and many of the photographs taken during the Civil War were tintypes.  They are not made on tin, but are a type of photograph made on a sheet of blackened iron.  A mobile tintype photography booth will be set up at the Penobscot Marine Museum on Wednesday, July 29 and visitors may have their tintype portrait taken or can watch a tintype demonstration.  The tintype booth is run by the AgNO3 Lab, which specializes in formal tintype portraits. Portraits are $40 per tintype, which includes a 2 for 1 museum admission.  The tintype booth will be set up between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm.  The tintype demonstration begins at 2:00 pm.  Portraits will be made on a first come first served basis or reservations for a portrait may be made by calling the museum at 207-548-0334.

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Making a Tintype Portrait is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.


Hand-painting Black & White Photographs Workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Create an extraordinary work of art by transforming a  black and white photograph using the historic technique of hand-painting in the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum.  This intensive workshop, led by fine-art photographer Liv Kristin Robinson, explores traditional methods for applying pigments to black & white images.  Suitable photos will be provided by the museum or bring your own black & white, matte surfaced, images. Painting materials will be provided.

Liv Kristin Robinson, a Belfast area fine-art photographer who is well known for her hand-painted images, has shown widely.  Robinson trained as an artist and art historian in New York City, and her originals are to be found in several private and public collections including The New York Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Colby College and the Farnsworth Museum of Art.

There are two opportunities to take the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer: Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 to 3:00 pm andWednesday, August 12, 1:00 to 3:00 pm.  The workshop fee is $10, $7 for Museum members and Searsport residents.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography. It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras. The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.


3-D Views of New England Explored

Stereo-Bangor

Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman

Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman

Stereoviews took the world by storm and were the most popular form of photography from the 1860’s through the 1920’s.  In his talk Stereo Views of New England, Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman provides 3-D glasses and projects historic 3-D stereoview images of Maine and New England.  The audience experiences the images as they were originally meant to be seen.  “It will bring you to closer to history than you’ve ever been before,” says Fishman.  People, landscapes, work at home and in industry, entertainments, communities, maritime and agricultural scenes will be among those featured, in this first such public show ever given in Maine.

Stereo Views of New England, an illustrated lecture by Bernard Fishman, will be presented onThursday, July 30, 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8 or $5 for museum members. Purchase tickets online at www.penobscotmarinemuseum.org or call the Visitors Center 207-548-0334or Administrative Offices at 207-548-2529.

Stereo Views of New England is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.


Photography Framing Workshop Offered at Penobscot Marine Museum

Museum-framer

Penobscot Marine Museum Framer Lin Calista will conduct a photography framing workshop, Framing Tips and Tricks, on Saturday, July 25, 9:00 am to noon at PMM’s Stephen Phillips Memorial Library.  The workshop will help photographers decide on the best ways to frame their photographs.  New and useful products on the market, backing options, mounting and hinging techniques, and appropriate glass and acrylic options will be presented.  Topics will also include whether to mat or not, frame choices to accentuate your subject, ideas for framing on a budget, and how to think outside the frame!

Please call the Museum Visitors Center at 207-548-0334 to register in advance for Framing Tips and Tricks.  The workshop will be held at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Stephen Phillips Memorial Library, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  The workshop cost is $5.   PMM members are free.

Framing Tips and Tricks is offered as part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography which includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.


Learn How to Make a Camera

Anne-Claude Cotty, Stonington Piers, pinhole photograph

Anne-Claude Cotty, Stonington Piers, pinhole photograph

Make a pinhole camera using a box from the kitchen shelf and take beautiful soft-focus photographs in the Make a Pinhole Camera workshops offered at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer.  A pinhole camera is a camera without a lens and with a single small aperture, a pinhole. Light from a scene passes through this single point and projects an inverted image on the opposite side of the box where a piece of film or photographic paper is wedged or taped into the other end.  The ethereal images made with a pinhole camera seem magical.  Workshop teacher Anne-Claude Cotty is a photographer, artist and teacher living in Stonington, Maine.  She has taught at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and her work has been exhibited at the University of Maine Museum of Art, Colby College Art Museum, and the Portland Museum of Art.

Anne-Claude Cotty, Islands by Kayak, pinhole photograph

Anne-Claude Cotty, Islands by Kayak, pinhole photograph

There are two opportunities to take the Make a Pinhole Camera workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer: Thursday, July 23, 1:00 to 4:00 pm and Thursday, August 6, 1:00 to 4:00 pm.  The cost is $10 per person, $7 for Museum members.  Make a Pinhole Camera is open to all ages, but young children must be accompanied by an adult.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Make a Pinhole Camera is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.


Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing Film at Penobscot Marine Museum

Racing lobster boats photo courtesy Jon Johansen.

Racing lobster boats photo courtesy Jon Johansen.

Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing season is here. Lobsterboat racing has been happening in Maine for over a century, and began casually. Today the races are not for the faint of heart; they are highly, excitingly, competitive. On Thursday, July 9, at Penobscot Marine Museum, videographer and lobsterman David Osgood of Vinalhaven will show his film of the races. Osgood has been racing lobster boats in the Maine Lobsterboat Racing circuit for many years. His boats include the Split S.E.C.O.N.D., a Crowley Beal 33 and STARLIGHT EXPRESS, a Northern Bay 36.

Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing will be shown at 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine. Tickets are $8; $5 for museum members and Searsport residents. For more information or to purchase tickets click here or call 207-548-0334.


Historic Photographs from Penobscot Marine Museum at Maine’s 2015 Antique Paper Show

Postcard of Searsport, collection of Penobscot Marine Museum

Postcard of Searsport, collection of Penobscot Marine Museum

Historic images from Penobscot Marine Museum’s collection of over 140,000 photographs will be available at the Maine 2015 Antique Paper Show on Saturday, June 27, from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm at the First Congregational Church Vestry, 8 Church Street, Searsport. This show complements the museum’s photography exhibit Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, which includes a gigantic walk-in camera obscura.

Penobscot Marine Museum’s collection of historic photographs began with a collection of negatives from a turn-of-the-nineteenth-century postcard company, Eastern Illustrated & Publishing Company of Belfast, Maine. Postcards, which were hugely popular in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, and their glass plate negatives still have a significant presence in the museum’s collection. They paint a picture with words as well as images of life a hundred years ago.

The Maine 2015 Antique Paper Show: Postcards and Paper Collectibles includes thousands of vintage postcards, old maps, historic photographs, sheet music, and paper ephemera. Free appraisals for your paper collectibles will be available from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Admission is $2, and includes $2 off of a Penobscot Marine Museum admission ticket.

For more information call Kevin Johnson at 207-548-2529 ext.210.


Three Forgotten Women Photographers Brought to Light

Earl G. Shettleworth, photo by Joe Phelan/Kennebec-Journal

Earl G. Shettleworth, photo by Joe Phelan/Kennebec-Journal

Between 1900 and 1940 many Maine photographers made “real photo” post cards of local scenes and events. At a time when most professional photographers were men, three women largely forgotten today created memorable artistic images which provide rich insights into how Maine people lived and worked in inland towns and coastal villages a century ago.  In his illustrated lecture The Land and Sea of Three Maine Women Photographers: The Real Photo Post Cards of Thurza Foss, Minnie Libby, and Josephine Townsend, Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., explores the beautiful photography of Thurza Foss (1860-1937) of Harmony, Minnie Libby (1863-1947) of Norway, and Josephine Townsend (1900-1981) of Monhegan.

Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr. is Maine State Historian and Director and State Historic Preservation Officer of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission.  The Land and Sea of Three Maine Women Photographers: The Real Photo Post Cards of Thurza Foss, Minnie Libby, and Josephine Townsend is Thursday, June 18, 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8; $5 for Searsport residents and Penobscot Marine Museum members.  For tickets click here or call 207-548-2529 or 207-548-0334.


Searsport High School Students Discuss Moving Stories of Maine Veterans

Uniforms from Memoirs of War: A Soldier’s Seabag at Penobscot Maine Museum.

Uniforms from Memoirs of War: A Soldier’s Seabag at Penobscot Maine Museum.

This winter five Searsport District High School seniors, Connor Fraser, Dylon Grant, Kevin Keniston, Anthony Powers, and Bartley Santos, curated an exhibit, Memoirs of War: A Soldier’s Seabag, which opened this spring at the Penobscot Marine Museum. Working with PMM assistant curator Cipperly Good and SDHS teacher Kathleen Jenkins, the students chose objects from Penobscot Marine Museum’s collection, researched the objects, researched the wars, and interviewed Maine veterans about their war experiences. Using objects the veterans took with them to war and objects they brought back home, this exhibit tells the story of ten Maine veterans’ wartime experiences from WW II to the present. On Wednesday, June 17, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm, the students, two of whom are joining the Army National Guard this summer, will share with the public the moving stories they discovered while curating the exhibit. In Penobscot Maine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine. Admission is free.


Award-winning Maine Boat Builder in Film at Penobscot Marine Museum

Ralph Stanley: An Eye for Wood is a moving documentary on the extraordinary life of world-renowned Maine Master Boat Builder Ralph Stanley. Stanley, the son of a lobsterman, grew up on Mt. Desert Island and began building wooden boats in the early 1950’s. He has built more than 70 fine wooden boats including working lobster boats, Friendship sloops, lobster boats, yachts, dories, and rowboats. In 1999 Stanley received a National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, recognizing his artistic excellence and contribution to our national traditional arts heritage.

Ralph Stanley

Ralph Stanley

Ralph Stanley is well-known not just for his boats, but also as a master story-teller, genealogist, and musician.  Award-winning Maine Filmmaker Jeff Dobbs tells the story of the entire Stanley family, their importance to American and Maine craftsmanship, and their way of life on Mount Desert Island and the Cranberry Isles in the twentieth century.

Ralph Stanley: An Eye for Wood, will be shown Thursday, June 4, 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8; $5 for museum members.  Call 207-548-0334 for tickets or click here to purchase online.


Maiden Voyage for Searsport Student Creations

Maiden-Voyage-WABI

“It’s the town’s DNA, so it really works especially well for Searsport,” says boat building instructor Greg Rossel.

Boat building and sea fairing is the heart of the town’s long history.

High schoolers from Searsport District High School continued that tradition with the launch of three shellback dinghy’s they built themselves.The boat-building class is made possible by Wayne and Lorraine Hamilton.

“Just like math class, you learn a lot more hands on, you’re never bored,” explained 10th grader Cameron Watt.

That hands-on work kept students interested who’d never even thought of boat building.

“It’s pretty interesting actually. You get to build some boats. It’s actually a really hard process. You have to epoxy stuff,” said Rhonda Howard, also a 10th grader.

The idea is to bring together math and science from conventional classes in a real world setting.

“Boat building is a great metaphor for all the classes that they’ve been taking at school, whether it’s math, science, geometry,” Rossel said.

“If we wanted to do this after high school, we could get a job in it because we have some experience,” said Watt.

At the maiden launch there’s always one concern.

“I hope they don’t sink,” said Howard, with a laugh.

Click here to see the video.


Bizarre Chair on Exhibit at Penobscot Marine Museum

A bizarre cage-chair on wheels, built in 1896 as a deterrent to Maine’s hobos, will be on display as part of Penobscot Marine Museum’s 2015 exhibit Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light.  The chair, which is on loan to the Penobscot Marine Museum from the Bangor Historical Society, was designed and apparently used by Oakland, Maine deputy sheriff Sanford J. Baker, but he failed to get the Maine Legislature to adopt it state-wide.  The chair was then exhibited during  parades as a side-show.  Around 1920 a photograph was taken of the chair with a bystander posing inside.  This photograph and the chair will both be on exhibit at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer.

hobo-chair

Hobo/Tramp Chair, Penobscot Marine Museum

“We are grateful to the Bangor Historical Society for the loan of this unusual object, said Kevin Johnson, Penobscot Marine Museum’s photo archivist.  “It is exciting to have the real object to exhibit next to the photograph.”  The chair currently resides at the Bangor Police Department.  It weighs 800 pounds and is being transported by special arrangement with American Concrete Industries in Veazie.

“Sharing pieces of history is an important part of our mission,” Bangor Historical Society Executive Director Melissa Gerety said. “Partnerships like this allow more people a chance to learn about the history of our region.”

The Hobo Chair and photograph are one of many unusual exhibits in Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light.  Museum visitors will be able to walk into a huge camera, step inside an historic darkroom, watch a tintype being made, make a cyanotype photograph, make a pin-hole camera, take a photograph with a pin-hole camera, take photographs of themselves standing beside images of people from the 1880’s, add their own photographs to an online museum exhibit, and add their selfies to the museum’s “Wall of Selfies”.  On Friday, May 22nd from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm the public is invited to the opening reception for the 2015 season, which will be held in the newly renovated Visitors Center on the Crescent, 2 Church Street, Searsport.  Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light is at Penobscot Marine Museum May 23 through October 18.

The Bangor Historical Society has been preserving, protecting and sharing the rich history of the Bangor Region since 1864. The BHS is based in the historic Thomas A. Hill House at on the corner of Union and High Streets in Bangor. It houses one of the nation’s largest Civil War collections, a number of items from Bangor businesses and families as well as an extensive photo collection. During the summer season the BHS offers a number of walking tours telling the tales of Bangor and its people. The Bangor Historical Society and Thomas A. Hill House Museum is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning June 2nd. Call 942-1900 or visit http://www.bangorhistoricalsociety.org for more information.


News Archives