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Have Your Tintype Taken Again!

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

The tintype photography booth at Penobscot Marine Museum was so popular in July that the museum has arranged for the booth to return, giving everyone another opportunity to have their tintype taken. The tintype booth is run by the AgNO3 Lab, which specializes in formal tintype portraits. The tintype process will be demonstrated to visitors during the day as the portraits are made.  The tintype booth will return to Penobscot Marine Museum, Searsport, on Tuesday, August 18, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.  Portraits will be made on a first come first served basis but reservations are recommended.  Portraits are $40 per tintype, which includes a 2 for 1 museum admission.  To make a reservation for a portrait call the museum at 207-548-0334.

“We are pleased to have the tintype booth back at Penobscot Marine Museum,” says Kevin Johnson, the Museum’s Photo Archivist.  “The booth was booked solid and we had to turn people away.  We had a crowd of visitors happily watching the tintypes being made.  It was fascinating.”  Tintypes were popular in the 1860’s and 1870’s, and many of the photographs taken during the Civil War were tintypes.  They are not made on tin, but are a type of photograph made on a sheet of blackened iron.

Making a Tintype Portrait is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Northern Maine 100 Years Ago in Film at Penobscot Marine Museum

Snowshoes, photograph by Isaac Walton Simpson

Snowshoes, photograph by Isaac Walton Simpson

Isaac Walton Simpson was born in 1874 in Amity, Maine near the Canadian border.  To support his family of thirteen children he worked as a blacksmith, barber, musician, woodsman, mechanic, and photographer.  Over his lifetime Simpson took thousands of photographs.  The photographs, mostly glass negatives, were stored in the attic of the family home until one of Simpson’s grandchildren told filmmaker Sumner McKane about them.  Simpson’s photographs provide a moving and rarely-seen portrait of life in northern Maine at the turn of the century.  McKane interviewed Simpson’s family, found archival film, and used Simpson’s photographs to create The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson, an eye-opening documentary about the men, women and children who carved out a life a hundred years ago in the isolation of northern Maine.

Penobscot Marine Museum presents The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson, Thursday, August 13, at 7:00 pm in the First Congregational Church Vestry, 8 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Live music composed by Sumner McKane accompanies the film.  This event is made possible by a grant from the Maine Humanities Council and the Maine Arts Commission.  Tickets are $10; $7 for Searsport residents and Penobscot Marine Museum Members.  For more information or to purchase tickets go to the event page or call 207-548-0334.

Sumner McKane grew up in Damariscotta, where his father is an electrician.   He is an award-winning filmmaker and musician.  His previous film In the Blood depicts the life, skills, and character of the turn-of-the-century Maine lumbermen & river drivers. He is currently working on a third film entitled Running Rum, an historical documentary that tells the story of rum-runners and bootleggers in the Northeast between the years of 1851-1933. He lives in Wiscasset, Maine with his wife and two children.

The Maine Frontier: Through the Lens of Isaac Walton Simpson is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Make Art with Historic Photographs at Penobscot Marine Museum

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J. Bronstein

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J. Bronstein

Draw, color, and paint on photographs from the Penobscot Marine Museum collection to create your own work of art in the workshop Photoplay with M.J. Bronsteinon Wednesday, Aug 19th.   Artist and photographer M.J. Bronstein pioneered the idea of using photographs as prompts for creativity in her popular PhotoPlay books.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to truly bring history to life, and to share our historic images with the community,” says Kevin Johnson, photo archivist at Penobscot Marine Museum.  “And Marcie Bronstein is the perfect teacher, she inspires creativity.  We are thrilled to have her lead this workshop.”  Bronstein created art programs for Center for Maine Contemporary Art, is the author of many books including PhotoPlay, (published by Chronicle Books, March 2014), and is an onboard artist/instructor for Celebrity Cruises.

Photoplay with M.J. Bronstein is a drop-in workshop offered at Penobscot Marine Museum on Wednesday, Aug 19th between 10:00 am and noon.  Supplies are provided.  Tickets are $5 and free for members and Searsport residents.  The workshop is for all ages, but children must be accompanied by an adult.

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J.

from the book PhotoPlay!: Doodle, Design, Draw by M.J.

Photoplay with M.J. Bronstein is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs Workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Create an extraordinary work of art by transforming a  black and white photograph using the historic technique of hand-painting in the Hand-painting Black & White Photographsworkshop at Penobscot Marine Museum.  This intensive workshop, led by fine-art photographer Liv Kristin Robinson, explores traditional methods for applying pigments to black & white images.  Suitable photos will be provided by the museum or bring your own black & white, matte surfaced, images. Painting materials will be provided.  There are two opportunities to take the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop: Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 to 3:00 pm and Wednesday, August 12, 1:00 to 3:00 pm.  The workshop fee is $10, $7 for Museum members and Searsport residents.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Liv Kristin Robinson, a Belfast area fine-art photographer who is well known for her hand-painted images, has shown widely.  Robinson trained as an artist and art historian in New York City, and her originals are to be found in several private and public collections including The New York Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Colby College and the Farnsworth Museum of Art.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Have Your Tintype Taken at Penobscot Marine Museum

Tintypes were popular in the 1860’s and 1870’s and many of the photographs taken during the Civil War were tintypes.  They are not made on tin, but are a type of photograph made on a sheet of blackened iron.  A mobile tintype photography booth will be set up at the Penobscot Marine Museum on Wednesday, July 29 and visitors may have their tintype portrait taken or can watch a tintype demonstration.  The tintype booth is run by the AgNO3 Lab, which specializes in formal tintype portraits. Portraits are $40 per tintype, which includes a 2 for 1 museum admission.  The tintype booth will be set up between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm.  The tintype demonstration begins at 2:00 pm.  Portraits will be made on a first come first served basis or reservations for a portrait may be made by calling the museum at 207-548-0334.

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Tintype portrait by AgNO3 Lab

Making a Tintype Portrait is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs Workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Harbor Horse, photograph by Liv Kristin Robinson

Create an extraordinary work of art by transforming a  black and white photograph using the historic technique of hand-painting in the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum.  This intensive workshop, led by fine-art photographer Liv Kristin Robinson, explores traditional methods for applying pigments to black & white images.  Suitable photos will be provided by the museum or bring your own black & white, matte surfaced, images. Painting materials will be provided.

Liv Kristin Robinson, a Belfast area fine-art photographer who is well known for her hand-painted images, has shown widely.  Robinson trained as an artist and art historian in New York City, and her originals are to be found in several private and public collections including The New York Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Colby College and the Farnsworth Museum of Art.

There are two opportunities to take the Hand-painting Black & White Photographs workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer: Wednesday, August 5, 1:00 to 3:00 pm andWednesday, August 12, 1:00 to 3:00 pm.  The workshop fee is $10, $7 for Museum members and Searsport residents.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Hand-painting Black & White Photographs is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light, Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography. It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras. The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

3-D Views of New England Explored

Stereo-Bangor

Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman

Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman

Stereoviews took the world by storm and were the most popular form of photography from the 1860’s through the 1920’s.  In his talk Stereo Views of New England, Maine State Museum Director Bernard Fishman provides 3-D glasses and projects historic 3-D stereoview images of Maine and New England.  The audience experiences the images as they were originally meant to be seen.  “It will bring you to closer to history than you’ve ever been before,” says Fishman.  People, landscapes, work at home and in industry, entertainments, communities, maritime and agricultural scenes will be among those featured, in this first such public show ever given in Maine.

Stereo Views of New England, an illustrated lecture by Bernard Fishman, will be presented onThursday, July 30, 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  Tickets are $8 or $5 for museum members. Purchase tickets online at www.penobscotmarinemuseum.org or call the Visitors Center 207-548-0334or Administrative Offices at 207-548-2529.

Stereo Views of New England is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Photography Framing Workshop Offered at Penobscot Marine Museum

Museum-framer

Penobscot Marine Museum Framer Lin Calista will conduct a photography framing workshop, Framing Tips and Tricks, on Saturday, July 25, 9:00 am to noon at PMM’s Stephen Phillips Memorial Library.  The workshop will help photographers decide on the best ways to frame their photographs.  New and useful products on the market, backing options, mounting and hinging techniques, and appropriate glass and acrylic options will be presented.  Topics will also include whether to mat or not, frame choices to accentuate your subject, ideas for framing on a budget, and how to think outside the frame!

Please call the Museum Visitors Center at 207-548-0334 to register in advance for Framing Tips and Tricks.  The workshop will be held at Penobscot Marine Museum’s Stephen Phillips Memorial Library, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine.  The workshop cost is $5.   PMM members are free.

Framing Tips and Tricks is offered as part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography which includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Learn How to Make a Camera

Anne-Claude Cotty, Stonington Piers, pinhole photograph

Anne-Claude Cotty, Stonington Piers, pinhole photograph

Make a pinhole camera using a box from the kitchen shelf and take beautiful soft-focus photographs in the Make a Pinhole Camera workshops offered at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer.  A pinhole camera is a camera without a lens and with a single small aperture, a pinhole. Light from a scene passes through this single point and projects an inverted image on the opposite side of the box where a piece of film or photographic paper is wedged or taped into the other end.  The ethereal images made with a pinhole camera seem magical.  Workshop teacher Anne-Claude Cotty is a photographer, artist and teacher living in Stonington, Maine.  She has taught at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, and her work has been exhibited at the University of Maine Museum of Art, Colby College Art Museum, and the Portland Museum of Art.

Anne-Claude Cotty, Islands by Kayak, pinhole photograph

Anne-Claude Cotty, Islands by Kayak, pinhole photograph

There are two opportunities to take the Make a Pinhole Camera workshop at Penobscot Marine Museum this summer: Thursday, July 23, 1:00 to 4:00 pm and Thursday, August 6, 1:00 to 4:00 pm.  The cost is $10 per person, $7 for Museum members.  Make a Pinhole Camera is open to all ages, but young children must be accompanied by an adult.  For more information or to buy tickets call 207-548-0334 or click here.

Make a Pinhole Camera is part of Exploring the Magic of Photography: Painting with Light,Penobscot Marine Museum’s first major exhibition of historic photography.  It includes four exhibits, a walk-in camera, a wall of selfies taken by museum visitors, an historic darkroom, tintype and cyanotype demonstrations, and workshops on making pin-hole cameras.  The four exhibits, Through Her Lens: Women Photographers of Mid-Coast Maine, 1890-1920; Twenty Best; Evolution of the Photographic Snapshot: 1888-2015; and The Carters and the Lukes – Selections from the Red Boutilier Collection are filled with inter-active opportunities for visitors including life-sized photographic cut-outs with which visitors may photograph themselves, an online exhibit of visitor photographs and comments, and QR codes and tablets providing access to audio clips of interviews, biographies, and commentary by historians, curators and professional photographers.

Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing Film at Penobscot Marine Museum

Racing lobster boats photo courtesy Jon Johansen.

Racing lobster boats photo courtesy Jon Johansen.

Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing season is here. Lobsterboat racing has been happening in Maine for over a century, and began casually. Today the races are not for the faint of heart; they are highly, excitingly, competitive. On Thursday, July 9, at Penobscot Marine Museum, videographer and lobsterman David Osgood of Vinalhaven will show his film of the races. Osgood has been racing lobster boats in the Maine Lobsterboat Racing circuit for many years. His boats include the Split S.E.C.O.N.D., a Crowley Beal 33 and STARLIGHT EXPRESS, a Northern Bay 36.

Maine’s Lobster Boat Racing will be shown at 7:00 pm in Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery, 11 Church Street, Searsport, Maine. Tickets are $8; $5 for museum members and Searsport residents. For more information or to purchase tickets click here or call 207-548-0334.