Events

Lectures, Workshops, Events

For more information or to register for any of these programs, contact Jeana Ganskop, Education Director, at 207-548-2529 ext. 213 or jganskop@pmm-maine.org.

Maine Women Authors Of The 1950’S

Penobscot Marine Museum’s Douglas and Margaret Carver Memorial Art Gallery 11 Church St.Searsport,

With Cathleen Miller, and Melissa Hayes
Thursday, August 18, 7 pm, Carver Memorial Gallery, 11 Church St.
Cost: $8; $5 Members

Cathleen Miller, Curator of the Maine Women Writers Collection at UNE, Elizabeth Ogilvie biographer, Melissa Hayes, Ruth Moore Days organizers, Muriel Davisson and Miram Colwell, and devotee Jane O'Rourke will discuss how the novels of Mary Ellen Chase, Elisabeth Ogilvie, Ruth Moore, Miriam Colwell and Louise Dickinson Rich provide different portraits of the people and the state of Maine. This is the culminating event of Book Talks on Communicating Maine: Maine Women Authors Of The 1950’​s​.

Maine on Glass: The Early Twentieth Century in Glass Plate Photography An Illustrated Talk​

Boothbay Railway Village 586 Wiscasset Road (Route 27), Boothbay, ME

Fascinating historic photographs taken from 1909 to 1950 of a Maine which has almost completely disappeared are the subject of the new book Maine on Glass: The Early Twentieth Century in Glass Plate Photography by Maine State Historian Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., Penobscot Marine Museum Photo Archivist Kevin Johnson, and historian Bill Bunting. The photographs were originally taken to be made into postcards during the postcard craze of the early 1900s when billions of postcards were mailed world-wide. The photographs show Mainers at work and at play everywhere from lobster shacks and wilderness hunting camps, to steam and sailing ships and grand hotels. On Sunday, January 29th at 2:00 pm, Boothbay Railway Village presents an illustrated talk about Maine on Glass: The Early Twentieth Century in Glass Plate Photography with authors Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., Kevin Johnson, and Bill Bunting. The talk will take place inside the Museum’s 1847 Boothbay Town Hall. Admission is free, suggested donation of $5 appreciated.

Shipbuilding & Migration

Cipperly Good, curator at the Penobscot Marine Museum, will discuss locally built and captained vessels that were involved in the migration of Chinese Coolies to Cuba to work in the sugar industry in the 1860s. This program is offered as a free community event in anticipation of the 30th Annual Camden Conference. The 30th Anniversary Camden Conference Community Events Series is supported in part by the Maine Humanities Council. At Witherle Memorial Library.

The Mackerel Schooner AUGUSTA E. HERRICK

PMM Visitors Center 2 Church St., Searsport, ME

Visitors Center, 2 Church St.
Cost: $8, $5 Members
Ralph Stanley, historian and boatbuilder, will present a talk on the mackerel schooner AUGUSTA E. HERRICK. The Swans Island schooner "had the distinction of being the only centerboard schooner ever to be employed in the North American fisheries" according to historian Howard Chappelle.  The Swans Island fishermen, like owner William P. Herrick, led the Atlantic coast mackerel fisheries in catch rates.  Come learn more about the vigorous and hardy men and schooners of Swan's Island.

Globalization Is Not New: Maine’s Merchant Marine in 19th Century World Trade

University of Maine Hutchinson Center 80 Belmont AvenueBelfast,

The topic of the 31st Annual Camden Conference is New World Disorder and America’s Future.  PMM's curator, Cipperly Good, will speak at a Camden Conference-affiliated event about how she understands today's economic globalist from a historic view. 

This presentation will use primary source material, artifacts and images from the Penobscot Marine Museum to track the Maine merchant marine in the global market, when Downeasters were the global shippers. For more information call 207-548-2529.

Fishing During WWII

PMM’s Stephen Phillips Memorial Library 11 Church StSearsport,

Ralph Stanley, our beloved historian, boatbuilder, musician, and Board member, will talk about the perils, adventures, and day-to-day work of fishing out of Southwest Harbor, Maine during the War. For more information call 207-548-2529.

Free

Kosti Comes Home: An Exhibit of Maritime Images

Camden Public Library 55 Maine St., Camden, ME

At Camden Public Library
55 Main Street, Camden
April 3- April 30
Opening Reception: April 3 at 7:00 pm

April is Maritime Month and Penobscot Marine Museum will once again partner with the Camden Public Library and create an exhibit for the Picker Room. This is the first exhibit of Kosti Ruohomaa's photographs since his archive arrived back in Maine last year. On April 3rd at 7:00 pm there will be an opening reception for the exhibit and an illustrated talk by Kosti's biographer Deanna Bonner-Gantor. 

Tides: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean

Admissions Center 5 Church St, Searsport, ME

Cost: Free

Join author Jonathan White as he explores sea level rise, tide-generated electricity, the relation of sea- and land-creatures (including humans) to the tides and the moon, how tides are slowing the earth’s rotation and making the day longer, and why scientists have been maddened by the problem of explaining the tides for thousands of years.

Free

The “Great War” in Review

Admissions Center 5 Church St, Searsport, ME

Cost: $5 for members, $8 for non-members

In 2018, we commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the end of the “Great War”. Historian Paul Biddle provides insights into what led the United States to enter the war and how that influenced the outcome of the war.

Speaker: Maine in the China Trade

Penobscot Marine Museum 2 Church StreetSearsport,

Thursday, May 30, 6pm
$5 for members, $8 for non-members

Drugs, armed conflict, and free trade. Sound familiar? The First Opium War of the early 1840s, with British and Chinese fighting over the opium trade and Chinese sovereignty, opened up Chinese ports to the world. Maine's merchant mariners aboard Maine-built ships soon thereafter entered the Chinese import and export trade. The trade aboard Maine-built ships lasted into the turn of the 20th Century. In the meantime, Maine sea captains and their families brought back souvenirs, stories, and an economic understanding of China.