Maine and the Orient

Opium Pipe

Opium pipe of carved ivory.

Chinese Porcelain Tea Pot

Chinese export porcelain teapot, Mandarin pattern of the early to mid 19th century in the Famille Rose colors, a color named for the pinkish reds.

Chinese Lacquered Sewing Box

Laquered sewing boxes like this one were frequently found in Maine deepwater captains' homes, a useful gift or something that a captain's wife might have bought for herself when shopping in Canton. Chinese lacquered sewing box from Canton. Gilt chinoiserie, with carved ivory implements inside. 

Canton River and Approaches Chart

Detail of East India Archipelago, Western Route to China, Chart No. 5, showing Macao, the Canton River, and Hong Kong. Whampoa Reach was as high as trading vessels were allowed to sail on the Canton River.

Published by James Imray & Son, 1876.

Chinese Painting of the Hongs of Canton

Chinese painting of the Hongs of Canton and a view of Canton Harbor, c. 1850. These painting were produced in quantities to sell to the western merchants. There are six Chinese junks and an American steamboat in the foreground. Flags of America, France, Britain and Denmark fly. A massive fire destroyed these buildings in 1856. Hongs served as residences, trading headquarters, and warehouses for western merchants in Canton. Westerners were restricted to the Hongs.

Routes to China during SW Monsoons

Map in book showing the best sailing routes to go to the Far East, during the SW Monsoon season from May to September.

From The Seaman's Guide to the Navigation of the Indian Ocean and China Sea by W.H. Rosser and J.F. Imray, 1867.

Indian Ocean Passages

Map in book showing the preferred sailing routes to go to India and the Far East, taking advantage of prevailing and trade winds and ocean currents. The most direct way was not always the fastest.

From The Seaman's Guide to the Navigation of the Indian Ocean and China Sea by W.H. Rosser and J.F. Imray, 1867.

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